As ubiquitous as onions are in the kitchen, there seem to be few tales of it around the fire. The simple fact that it is so common has made it humble. A far cry from ancient Egyptian days when it was revered as a worthy offering to the gods

Walters Art Museum [Public domain, CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
By H. Zell (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Although this story points out that it may actually be that the humble onion is not unimportant but rather taken for granted.

Here is a tale of the onion doing what it does best.

This site has a great gathering of trivia about the onion.

There was a type of vendor known as Onion Johnnies. They originally brought onions across the English Channel from Roscoff, France to sell in Britanny. This site tells not only about these hardworking men but the also of the birth of a stereotype. Apparently, however, the Onion Johnnies are not completely gone. These fine Gentles have begun a revival of the practice.

ceridwen [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By the way, those brown, papery skins that most people throw away? Don't! They make a lovely natural dye. Here are instructions for dyeing fiber and, in the spirit of the season, for dyeing eggs. There are two methods- boil the skins and put the eggs in the dye bath, or wrap the eggs in the skins and put in the water.  I've done both. Either one makes lovely eggs for your basket.

by SomewhereInTheWorldToday, via Flickr

Just for fun, here are a couple of songs with our Noble Interest as a focus.

Do you know of any tales that present the onion as a hero? I'd love to hear them! Share them in the comments section. Please remember to like and share this post. Thanks for stopping by!

Tomorrow starts my new Friday feature- Tools, Techniques and Processes

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